Jude's Threshold

A Tapestry Blog of Astrology, Politics, and Social Concerns

Walter Cronkite and the New World Order

Well, if the US media has to go over and over the passing of “the most trusted man in America’, his bio and reporting chops, let’s remember Mr. Cronkite’s revealing statement on the United Nations, less American sovereignty, and the New World Order, just to keep things within a more balanced perspective on the man.

Yes, Mr. Cronkite was a one-world-government promoter just like the rest of the corporate media types. To my way of thinking, this puts him in the category of ‘Terror Promoters’ as well.

Are you surprised?

~:~

Heads-up on a post now in this blog’s sidebar in the Stars Over Washington feed: it’s a little Astrology on the birth chart of ‘Corporations Are People’ of May 10, 1886, if you’re interested.

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Written by Jude Cowell

July 18, 2009 at 10:08 pm

4 Responses

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  1. Thank you so much, Donna, for posting your remembrances of that cloudy war time. Even now i hear TV/radio commentators give numbers and places in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan, and i think: surely they are purposefully giving Incorrect info – the enemy is listening! So i’m totally with you on that.

    Your personal perspectives on war and journalism seem to have evolved though they’re hard fought and won, and I salute you for continuing to attempt to undertand these issues which affected your family so personally. Your Dad sounds like he was marvelous!

    Yes, ‘patriotism’ was used against the people and against foot-dragging congresspeople to push through the Iraq war. That much we sorrowfully know and some of us – you and me included – watched it unfold on C-SPAN while wondering how the American people could Possibly Fall for the Same Old Script again…a bum’s rush.

    And see where we are….another generation or two now maimed by fat old bald war-profiteers who once were called, jingoists, and who ought to be ashamed.

    Now the capitalists increase the rolls of the unemployed daily – to inspire military sign-ups? Bat fastards. jude

    Like

    judecowell

    July 20, 2009 at 7:52 pm

  2. Just thought I’d add that my dad, in Vietnam conflict, blamed Walter for the decline of American support of the mission when he started the nightly body bag counts.

    Anyway, I agree with you on his connections.
    dd

    Like

    donnadavidson

    July 18, 2009 at 11:45 pm

    • Wow, Donna, that’s interesting to say the least. Wonder if Cronkite was the ultimate vote on showing them on TV though?

      It was probably a group decision, don’t you think? Even a ratings issue (to be most cynical.)

      Still I was whippersnappering about in those days and showing returning war casualties was more of a clincher to what many of us at home already felt and knew. It did express the costs more starkly to those who’d tried not to pay attention…but i wasn’t one of those.

      And it was your Dad’s/ my generation being sacrificed – that time. Washington politicians – they can’t rush fast enough to wage illegal war but drag their feet on positive reforms on behalf of the people…why, one would think they didn’t really ‘care’ about us, wouldn’t one?

      Thanks for your input, DD! Jude

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      judecowell

      July 19, 2009 at 8:19 pm

      • Jude,
        Yep, I’m sure Walter didn’t cook up that idea all by himself. Surely he was used. But it bothered me because my dad was there, so my perspective on the nightly broadcasts was different than others’. It was the first war that folks watched the dead and dying every night at dinner time. Mom started turning it off.

        And Dad had to deal with the media when he was there. He was trying to keep the sons of his WWII buddies alive long enough to get them out of there. He came up with IDASC, or a system of coordinating all the services’ air support of the troops. This was not easy. None of the services wanted to share tactical info or hand over their power to another service. He would sleep on the planes at night and one night heard the voice of one of those sons, my boyfriend. If he hadn’t heard Joe Belser’s voice that night over the radio Joe would have died. He needed air cover and Dad got it.

        The training bases were getting clobbered and troop positions were being broadcast on nightly news – so Dad decided to move one of the hardest hit training bases one night – subrosa. He had been thinking about it for a while and had made some preparations. General Momyer wasn’t pleased about hearing it after the fact, supply lines and all. But many were saved by such tactics, so Dad had a particular view of the coverage of the war and how it affected his ability to get the boys home.

        It wasn’t until Thanksgiving 1988 that I heard how he felt about Walter – and he was unusually vehement.

        It took him 20+ years before he could even look at the Vietnam wall on TV.

        He retired a general, commander of the 20th Air Division in Petersburg, Va., after 30 years in the Air Force. He and Mom are buried together at Arlington National Cemetery.

        I have always had a slight tilt to my view of how to cover wars. I don’t believe politicians should be able to wage war – or conflicts – to take an offensive position in the world for secret reasons. I was aghast when we went into Iraq. I couldn’t believe the people weren’t crying foul – it was like everyone was in a 911/back Bush patriotic stupor.

        Anyway, war and journalism has always had a special grip on me. I’m still working out how I feel about it.

        I watched the “Orwell rolls over in his grave” video you suggested on your Stars Over Washington blog and it helped clear up some things for me.

        One thing I am sure about is if American soldiers are in harm’s way, the news should not give the enemy any clues on how to get to them.

        I think Walter should have felt that way, too.
        DD

        Like

        Donna Davidson

        July 19, 2009 at 11:26 pm


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